28 de marzo de 2012

Lacan dot com - JLW










"In The Wolf Man, I would say that the sudden appearance of the wolves in the window in the dream plays the function of the "s," as representative of the loss of the subject.
It is not only that the subject is fascinated by the sight of these wolves, which number seven, and which, in fact, in his drawing of them perched on the tree number only five. It is that their fascinated gaze is the subject himself.
What does the whole case show? It shows that at each stage in the life of the subject, something always arrived to reshape the value of the determining index represented by this original signifier. Thus the dialectic of the subject's desire as constituting itself from the desire of the Other is correctly grasped. Remember the adventure of the father, the sister, the mother and the servant-woman Groucha. So many different stages that enrich the unconscious desire of the subject with something that is to be put, as signification constituted in relation to the desire of the Other, in the numerator."—JL





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